Sunday, 2 March 2014

Matilda update

Babies are irresistible. Especially if they are family, and you have the opportunity to forge a connection with them as often as you like.

Yesterday (1 March) I went up to London and visited my nephew M--- and his girlfirend C---, and little Matilda, who is now just over five months old. She looked like this:


Not quite yet able to sit up unsupported, but getting there. And no longer the slightly wrinkled little thing she was last November:


Don't three months make a difference? She was still very well-behaved: lots of smiles and noises of pleasure, and not many trembling tears of woe. Let's have a short Matildafest:


No, C--- wasn't trying to teach Matilda to read! She simply liked to touch things, and found books good for that. Her favourite 'book' was in fact a fabric affair, with all kinds of things sewn onto the 'pages' that were interesting to touch...or bite...


Oh, who's that then?


I got to hold her twice this time. She didn't turn a hair.


And here's proud Daddy:


Thirty-one years ago, in 1983, M--- was the baby. My late brother Wayne was just as pleased to be a father:


And did this feisty, carefree young man of twenty have any clear notion in 2003 that one day he'd be a parent himself?


So the years pass, so the generations rise in succession. Some of us push it all forward, as parents. Some others, like me, stand aside and simply watch in admiration. And get to hold the baby as a delightful privilege.

3 comments:

  1. Nice pictures Lucy and a lovely baby. I wish I could post some of my own grandchild (though she will know me as Aunty Shirley) but my son and his wife won't allow pictures of their child to be posted on the Internet. Sad really because she is a beautiful two-year-old child.

    Shirley Anne x

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  2. Really coming alive in such a short time! I can't imagine the commitment and gamble to having a child, I was lucky enough to have a number grow up knowing me but the greatest joy was knowing that you could hand them back when they became fractious and then go home for uninterrupted sleep...

    I have no regrets about stopping my line of DNA, the world is not such an ideal world to live in, besides I have never been able to earn enough to feed a cat let alone bring up a child.

    Being an aunty has to be one of the best roles going...

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  3. Gorgeous photos and how lovely to see proud great aunt Lucy doing her stuff. I guess the role of auntie is not unlike that of grandparent - with both there's the privilege of being able to hand them back when you want some peace.

    ReplyDelete

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