Friday, 28 February 2014

Who says honesty doesn't pay?

Or at least, that being honest - and owning up - need not mean a slap in the face for your trouble.

Sorry, this is another post about my car insurance dilemma - except that it's now resolved, and I have come out of it unscathed!

Having written what I did earlier today, indecision and worry kept nagging at me as to whether to tell my car insurance company about being caught by the Police camera for speeding, and then ending up on the Speed Awareness Course. No, I decided, it wasn't good enough to keep the information from them. It was something that they clearly might be interested to know about. I did see how speeding might be relevant to assessing my personal risk of having an accident. Keeping quiet was a deception. It was dishonest. I knew it was.

So at just after 4.15pm I picked up the phone and spoke to a very pleasant girl (all these girls seem to be very nice) at Liverpool Victoria, who, as 'LV=Frizzell', handle my car insurance through my membership of the CSMA, the Civil Service Motoring Association. I've been insured with them for years, even though from time to time I do check out alternative insurers for a quote. But I never move. LV always seem to have a good policy at a good price - and whenever I have had an accident over the years, they have been wonderfully efficient. Now that matters.

It did cross my mind, at the very last moment, that the CSMA - which lobbies for motorists - was unlikely to have a pet insurance company that clobbered their members in aggravating little ways. But I might be wrong. I went through with the call.

I briefly explained to the girl that I'd been caught speeding, and had been put on a Speed Awareness Course. And that I was telling her this because I understood the company needed to know of all material facts that could have a bearing on my cover.

But not so! She quickly made sure that I hadn't got penalty points and a fine. No, only the course. That was all right then. The course was not a conviction. It was instead of a conviction. They didn't need to know anything about the speeding incident, nor the course.

Not the place and date, for your records? No. Right. That's something cleared up then. Bye bye.

As you can imagine, I felt absolutely brilliant as I finished the call. The Melford Honour shone radiantly, unblemished! I'd done the proper thing. And no financial penalty had been imposed for doing something that certain people would certainly have considered daft, if not downright foolish.

I know there may be sneers. It's easy to say that I made that call just to get something off my mind - almost a self-indulgent act. Phooey. I now know exactly where I stand. I will positively relish the course!

You know, living without important doubts is a wonderful thing.

4 comments:

  1. Some of us were brought up to be honest and law abiding, though as you have proved this gets harder as cars are built to cruise effortlessly far above the maximum speed limits...

    Insurance companies are often less than friendly to their customers and illogical. When the only tree likely to fall and cause damage had fallen the premiums went up though the risk had probably and literally fallen by 100%!

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  2. Echoing Caroline, insurance companies long ago went very low on my most loved organization list, however, I understand perfectly what you did, and why.

    Honesty is not a policy. It is a way of life. You either are or are not honest.

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  3. Just don't get caught speeding again Lucy! Notice I say 'don't get caught' for surely you will speed again somewhere, we all do it on occasion. Talking about speeding I have been making a more concerted effort to keep within the limits over the last few months and it is very difficult at times, especially as doing so seems to upset many other drivers. I wonder why?

    Shirley Anne x

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  4. Yes, I've been hooted twice this week for sticking to the 30mph limit. No doubt they also mumbled 'Volvo drivers!' or 'Women drivers!' under their breath.

    Lucy

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