Saturday, 21 December 2013

Fun and good cheer at Trevor Sorbie

It was time for another visit to Trevor Sorbie, my hairdresser in Brighton since March 2009.

I really like going there. For one thing, they know me by name at the reception counter, and cry 'Hello, Lucy!' every time I pop in. It makes you wonder whether they get special face-recognition training. Or whether, as you enter, sophisticated cameras instantly scan a photo archive, get a match on your face, and flash your name up on the counter screen! Perhaps they just naturally take such an interest in their clients, so that they remember who you are from month to month.

Georgia on reception is one in particular who always gives me a warm welcome, and it makes me feel special and valued. And it's not just reception. Even the girls who wash your hair and massage your head - and how I love firm fingers on my head as I lie back, something I get nowhere else - know who you are. Robyn is my usual for the wash and massage, although today I had Chloƫ, who was sporting a daring hair cut with one segment of it blonde, while the rest was chestnut. So we discussed hair colours. Not that I have any intention of colouring my hair. And indeed, while waiting for my stylist, Morgan, to take me off, I was chatting to a woman who had come in after me to get her hair recoloured. She thought I was so lucky to have a naturally attractive hair colour, and she begged me to stay with it. Well, you don't ignore such comments, do you?

This was the last time I would see Morgan for a while. She is flying off on Christmas Day evening for the Far East, travelling with a girl friend, and not returning till early May. A holiday of a lifetime, certainly as regards duration! Another stylist at Trevor Sorbie, Alison, is to be her official substitute; and last time Alison sat with us, to note carefully what Morgan did with my hair. I'm sure I shall be in very good hands, but I shall miss Morgan, and I really hope she does come back.

Anyway, I had a Christmas card ready for Morgan, with goofy reindeer on it. We swapped news of course. She brought me a second large glass of wine (the wine came free) and a mince pie (I protested over the pie, but cheerfully gave in), and after the cut, and the blow-dry with a little hair twirling to give me a slightly ruffled look, we gathered at reception for payment and farewells. And a little photography! Here's Georgia and another girl beckoning Morgan to join them for a group shot, and the three of them together (Georgia centre, Morgan right):


And here's Morgan with me:


They are all gorgeous girls. What they must think of frumpy me!

Afterwards I met my friend Alice outside a pub, the one who has 'starred' in a film, and we went in for lunch and a couple more drinks. What a life.

8 comments:

  1. Definitely not frumpy! And you hair really suits you Lucy. Enjoyed the post - thank you :o) x

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  2. As someone who never visited a hairdressers since before leaving school in the 60s it is heartbreaking to be reminded all that we have been missing getting personal attention and good company.

    I am jealous, perhaps last week was just too early for christmas glasses of wine...

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  3. Oh, Caroline, don't be jealous! The wine may have come free, but I had nearly £100 to pay (£80 plus product, plus tips), and a lot of people would think me daft for spending so much on an hour's pleasure.

    But I do agree that we all missed out on a carefree lovely-young-girl-about-town thing that we can never recover now. Morgan (only mid-twenties) said that she is already feeling wistful for her late teens, even though at the same time maturity and experience allows her to get more genuine fun and zest out of being alive.

    It's always a contest between being young and callow, with boundless opportunities, optimism and energy - and being older, with a sharper sense of pleasure but not the time or stamina or innocence to enjoy it quite the same.

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  4. WHAT, a £100 for a hairdo? You must have more money than sense Lucy. To be quite frank your hair doesn't look any different from what I have seen. OK if it pleased you to be pampered I suppose the money might be worth it but I know you could have done the same job for a fraction of the cost. You keep telling us you have to watch your spending at least until you get your pension but you've £100 to throw away on your hair. I have never been to a hairdresser and would only ever visit one if I wanted a change of style or to have it cut. My spending on my hair amounts to a quality shampoo and a good conditioner. You could have saved some of that cash for your next caravan trip.

    Shirley Anne x

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  5. What a scold you are, Shirley Anne!

    Feel-good expenditure can take many forms. This is a form that appeals to me. End of story.

    Lucy

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    Replies
    1. Didn't I say that if it pleased you to do that well it was OK? I still think it a complete waste of money.

      Shirley Anne x

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  6. One thing I really love in my new life is being pampered. Sadly, there's not enough left on top for a hair-do (and never will be unless the Minoxidil takes effect) but eyebrow trims and even electrolysis are so lovely, especially when they play that soothing wave music. I'm instantly and blissfully transported back to Cornwall.

    Us country and up-country girls are frequently surprised at prices in the leafy South East but having seen the end product several times, I reckon not a penny is wasted. Indeed, I was thinking of you when I chose my latest hairpiece. Now look out for the Alice Band too!

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  7. Exactly. Money is there to be used, on essential things first of course, but after that...well, anything really that makes life interesting or pleasurable!

    Lucy

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