Saturday, 21 May 2011

Blood!

Today I decided after breakfast that I was going to have another jolly good feel of my female bits, particularly of course the clitoris.

This isn't something I have done much of since the op in March. The first time was just before I had my ten-week post-op check - about two weeks ago. I'd wanted to see how much feeling there was in the clitoris, because I knew Mr Thomas would ask. There was some - hardly an electrifying sensation though! But hey-ho, it's early days.

Well, a little bit of tentative rubbing on this occasion also produced some sensation, but it was very much the same low-key feeling as last time.

I thought I'd been very gentle with myself, but clearly not, because when I withdrew the finger there was a little smear of blood. Yikes! How come?

I got into a good light with my magnifying mirror, and had a close look. Hmmm. The clitoris seemed fine, unblemished. The only other obvious source of the blood seemed to be the urethra, but that too seemed intact. I noticed however some little red marks on the surrounding skin, that could have been the remains of suture lines. Maybe I'd stretched these in some way when probing, or snagged the skin with my nail, even though it was cut short and well smoothed off.

Well, one pee later and I was convinced it wasn't the urethra, so the blood must have come from the little marks on the surrounding skin. There was no blood, no pain, and no discomfort during the rest of the day. Dilating was problem-free. I decided that - apart from ordinary washing with the shower jet - to leave things undisturbed in there for a while, so that whatever had bled could heal up.

I think this shows that even though the new tissue may look good, it is still in fact quite fragile, and you need to give the surgical area plenty of time to heal up, much more time than you think ought to be enough!

6 comments:

  1. So no organic dilators just yet ;)

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  2. Maybe too much information :0)

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  3. @Sejd:
    One of the purposes of this blog is to pass on useful information.

    Post-op information is sparse on the internet because it's well after the Big Event that grabs most of the attention. So if anyone is willing to share ongoing personal experiences about the healing process, it's got to be a Good Thing - and something to be encouraged.

    Personally, I don't think you can have 'too much information'.

    Lucy

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  4. I agree that there can't be too much information. I do feel some trepidation about exploring too enthusiatically soon and this is a tinely warning!

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  5. Of course you are right Lucy. I have no right to question what you put on your blog. I totally agree with your answer and I do apologize.

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Lucy Melford