Tuesday, 15 March 2011

The bag named after the woman who found a true man to love

Fancy that. I've been home a week already! And it's two weeks since the op itself.

Is there any recovery? Well, yes, but it's slight, not a lot to put my finger on. I just feel a little more energetic, a bit stronger, and not quite so uncomfortable (this is my first post sitting up - more like slouching, but never mind - at the PC. I'm sleeping very well. I'm eating very well (but my appetite never faltered throughout!). And fewer instances of absent-mindedness tell me that the anaesthetic must be disappearing from my system.

But I'm still sore along the suture lines, which are tight, and I remain swollen around the surgical site, although my hand mirror is definitely telling me that I'm rather less swollen than I was. So does peeing: it's a strong jet, and often goes straight down now, churning up the water, and only in the shower does it still have an affinity for my left leg - but then who cares, because a few seconds later I wash it off.

So I'd say there's nothing but positive progress to report, albeit modest. May the next two weeks show much more.

Meanwhile I've made my first online grocery order with Tesco - what a doddle. And I've fixed up Fiona's first sevice at 18,000 miles (she's actually done 17, 800 miles, which is near enough). Volvo will come to my home and collect her, do the service and give her a wash, then bring her back. So she gets some exercise while I'm still unable to drive, and she's ready for me when I'm allowed to use her.

And now for the subject of this post. It's something I didn't have time to fit in before the op. I went to Tunbridge Wells on 24 February and afterwards did a post about having to turn down a photo job. I also mentioned that I'd bought another handbag, made by Dubarry. Here it is:


Dubarry are an Irish firm mainly famous for their stylish boots. But they do other bits of country clothing too. All the country clothing and equipment firms do nowadays. Even Purdey the gunmakers will sell you a set of silver-plated drink coasters that look like the percussion end of a shotgun cartridge. A snip at 'only' £345!

Anyway, this bag went into the Nuffield hospital with me, which makes it special, and has been by my bedside ever since, patiently awaiting my first outing around the village, or up onto the Downs in Fiona to get some fresh air and the view. We have bonded. So, as with many of the personal things that I bond with, I have given her a name. I call her Verity.

And I am very much looking forward to taking Verity (and my new vagina) for a walk in the sunshine. A walk that will encompass a sea of bluebells and fields full of spring lambs, and a white windmill, all of which I can enjoy within a mile or two of where I live.

And why Verity? Well, if I say 'Winston Graham' and 'Poldark' and 'Captain Andrew Blamey' those in the know will need no further clue.

7 comments:

  1. Glad you're healing ok. Hope you are back behind the wheel of Fiona soon.

    Loving the bag. Not loving the commentary elsewhere on your blog before last.

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  2. Nothing wrong with finding a true man to love, but was Andrew Blamey so blameless? His first wife probably didn't think so.

    Nice to step away from the firey debates anyway!

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  3. That's a very nice bag, Lucy. I looks like a saddle bag.

    Good to hear you are slowly making progress, and there are no problems. Before you know it, you will be up and out!

    Does Tesco deliver those groceries you order online, or do you have to send someone out to pick them up for you?

    Melissa XX

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  4. Ah, 'twas the demon drink the first time. But he mastered himself, and all was well. And he stayed mastered.

    He did have a temper, and was easily provoked. But Verity saw in him many fine qualities that appealed to her, and the chemistry between them was perfect. And they lived happily ever after.

    And Ross Poldark liked him. What a recommendation!

    Oh dear, my cynical cover is blown. Yes, I confess a long-term liking for (high class) romantic fiction - if the reading list in my profile didn't already give it away! But I ready lots of other stuff too.

    Lucy

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  5. @Melissa:
    Tesco (and several other foodstores) deliver to your front door from a van, and if you ask nicely will bring it in. I shall have to ask, not being able to lift heavy bags off the floor. Tesco charges £4.00 for this. The delivery cost varies according to the time slot you choose, and may depend on spending enough on your groceries.

    Next week I may try Waitrose, who deliver free, but you must spend at least £50.00. Not hard to do!

    Lucy

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  6. @Melissa:
    Actually, Verity is not what I would call a saddle bag, that term implying something rather large and satchel-like. Verity is a compact bag, daintier than the similarly-shaped black Radley bag I've used for most of the past two years. But she still holds everything. And she has a touch more class. And I prefer tan to black. And she'll do better for most occasions not posh enough for the glamorous Prada bag!

    Lucy

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  7. Oh my goodness Lucy - I spat tea over my keyboard!! good luck taking your new vagina for a walk (I have visions of a pretty diamante collar and lead)

    lovely bag, I have a terrible handbag habbit! quite the addict. Glad you are comtinuing to get back to normal. xx

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Lucy Melford