Friday, 31 December 2010

Back from Cornwall, red faced

I got home yesterday.

The red face bit means that the keen winter Cornish breeze, occasionally subzero and laden with salt from the sea, has scorched my cheeks and chin. It's gradually come on, and reached its worst state while coming home from Cornwall yesterday. The skin was quite raw, flaking, and incredibly itchy. Since then, applications of E45 cream, calamine lotion, and aloe vera gel have eased the dire appearance of the skin, and I expect it'll be back to normal in the next couple of days. But just now my face has a tight, stretched feel as if I've had some rough surgery performed on it. I don't mind if that means a few lines have vanished forever, but probably no such luck. Meanwhile I haven't wanted to go out and spread fear and loathing.

After Boxing Day it got rather milder in Cornwall, so I'm thinking that the damage was done in the first few days when it really was bitter out. Pre-Christmas, I can recall a long cold late-afternoon tramp to see Men-An-Tol, and braving a searing wind at Coverack. Then there was that cold Christmas Day wandering around Padstow, and, post-Christmas now, looking for The Hurlers (a set of neolithic stone circles out on Bodmin Moor) on a raw afternoon of fog and driving rain. Perhaps the skin damage was cumulative, and each of these events added something. Silly me.

It was so nice to be back. I was not sleeping well, and one hour into the 280-mile return journey felt dog tired. I desperately wanted to get home and go to bed. I managed it by 4:00pm, just as it was getting dark, had unloaded by 6:00pm, and then, after an easy meal, flopped. I wasn't feeling too good.

Today has been better, but I've not gone out. It seemed wisest not to.

Happy New Year everyone!   

5 comments:

  1. You are such a brave girl, Lucy! I'm so glad you are finally home safe and sound. I was really concerned with you spending so much time alone at Christmas, especially under the harsh conditions that you endured.

    Chapped skin is no fun, and the dry winter air makes it even worse. Just keep applying moisturizer, and try to cover up as much skin as possible when out in the cold dry air. I have an especially hard time with my elbows, shins and feet this time of year. No amount of lotion ever seems to be enough.

    Here's wishing you a very Happy New Year Lucy, and the best of luck in 2011! March is only 3 months away. The days are ticking away!

    Melissa XX

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  2. Happy New Year!

    (Last time I got a red face in Cornwall, I think it was because I'd had rather too much single malt... :-) )

    Carolyn Ann

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  3. Welcome home, Lucy! Glad you are safe and sound and back in your own bed. It's hard to function when we're short of sleep or not sleeping well.

    I'm sure that in a while your skin will be back to normal. Hope you feel in top shape soon!

    And best wishes for what I'm sure will be an eventful 2011 for you!

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  4. Happy New Year, Lucy. I have been reading, with interest, your travels in the caravan and just imagining how I could sleep in that cold (no way I could!). Now, use lots of moisturizer to restore that skin to it's pretty and soft state.

    Calie xxx

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  5. Happy new year!
    Yes, the great freeze as i'm sure the media are calling it was very unkind to skin it does get better with the help of lots of moistureiser.

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